Category Archives: Music

Fantasy & Science Fiction Media, Spring 2014

FILM 4280/6280, Spring 2014

Tuesdays & Thursdays 1:00-2:15 PM, 401 Langdale

Screenings Tuesdays, 11:00 AM-12:50 PM, 406 Arts & Humanities

 

Ted Friedman

25 Park Place #1017

tedf@gsu.edu

http://twitter.com/tedfriedman

http://tedfriedman.com

 

 

Course Description

How do we dream our visions of the future? How do we explore our fantasies of the past?

 

Science fiction extrapolates the trends of the present to imagine possible future worlds, both utopian and (more often) dystopian. Fantasy looks back to imagine past worlds in which technology has not yet usurped nature. Both genres are rooted in mythic traditions that push beyond the boundaries of realism to reach for deeper truths.

 

This class will examine the genres of fantasy and science fiction across multiple media, including film, television, literature, comics and gaming. We’ll survey their history, while at the same time tracing the impact of each text forward into the present. We’ll look at how these works have reflected and influenced American society, as each new generation of creators has responded to changing social conditions by re-imagining the key tropes and themes of the genres. And we’ll try to understand why these visions continue to capture the world’s imagination.

 

Readings

Class readings will include books and a coursepack of articles. Here are the books you’ll need:

 

Maggie Hyde and Michael McGuinness, Introducing Jung

Salman Rushdie, The Wizard of Oz

Neal Gaiman, The Sandman: Season of Mists

Orson Scott Card, Ender’s Game

Karen Thompson Walker, The Age of Miracles

 

The course books can be ordered through online retailers such as amazon.com/student, bn.com, and powells.com. The coursepack is sold by Bestway Copy Center, 18 Decatur Street SE (on the first floor of One Park Place South).

 

Students in Film 6280 will read two additional books of their choice, one scholarly book and one work of fiction, and will present them in two separately scheduled meetings with the other graduate students.

 

Twitter Feed 

Relevant news and commentary will be shared with the class via the Twitter hashtag #fsfmedia. Feel free to respond to tweets or post your own.  Class Schedule

 

Unit I: Modern Myths

 

T 1/14 Understanding Fantasy and Science Fiction

 

Th 1/16 The Power of Myth

Ted Friedman, “Myth, the Numinous, and Cultural Studies”:

http://flowtv.org/?p=4161

Ted Friedman, “The Politics of Magic,”

http://www.scope.nottingham.ac.uk/article.php?issue=14&id=1138&section=article&q=rose

 

T 1/21 Star Wars

Joseph Campbell, excerpt from The Hero With a Thousand Faces (CP)

Christopher Vogler and Stuart Voytilla, excerpt from Myth and the Movies (CP)

 

Th 1/23 Archetypes and the Collective Unconscious

Hyde and McGuinness, Introducing Jung

Ted Friedman, “Jung and Lost”:

http://flowtv.org/?p=3865

Ursula K. LeGuin, “The Child and the Shadow” (CP)

 

T 1/28 The Lord of the Rings 

J.R.R. Tolkien, “Introduction to The Fellowship of the Ring” (CP)

J.R.R. Tolkien, “On Fairy Stories”:

http://bjorn.kiev.ua/librae/Tolkien/Tolkien_On_Fairy_Stories.htm

 

Th 1/30 Game of Thrones

 

 

Unit II: Folklore and Fantasy

 

T 2/4 The Wizard of Oz

Salman Rushdie, The Wizard of Oz

 

Th 2/6 Buffy the Vampire Slayer

Guillermo del Toro and Chuck Hogan, “Why Vampires Never Die”:

http://www.nytimes.com/2009/07/31/opinion/31deltoro.html?_r=1

Laura Miller, “Real Men Have Fangs”:

http://online.wsj.com/article_email/SB122540672952785957-lMyQjAxMDI4MjE1MTQxMDE2Wj.html

 

T 2/11 The Company of Wolves

Angela Carter, “The Company of Wolves” (CP)

Selections from Marjorie Tatar, ed., The Classic Fairy Tales (CP)

 

Th 2/13 Firefly

 

T 2/18 Where the Wild Things Are

Alison Lurie, “Something Wonderful Out of Almost Nothing”:

http://www.nybooks.com/articles/archives/2012/jul/12/something-wonderful-out-almost-nothing/

 

Th 2/20 Dollhouse

 

T 2/25 Spirited Away

Margaret Talbot, “The Auteur of Anime” (CP)

James W. Boyd and Tetsuya Nishimura, “Shinto Perspectives in Miyazaki’s Anime Film Spirited Away,” The Journal of Religion and Film 8.2 (October 2004):

http://www.unomaha.edu/jrf/Vol8No2/boydShinto.htm

Norkio T. Reider, “Spirited Away: Film of the Fantastic and Evolving Japanese Folk Symbols,” Film Criticism 29.3 (2005): 4-27:

http://www.corneredangel.com/amwess/papers/spirited_away.pdf

Aaron Sherwood, “Characterization, Narrative Structure and Mythopoeia in the Films of Hayao Miyazaki” (2006):

http://www.nausicaa.net/miyazaki/essay/files/AaronSherwood_Mythopoeia.pdf

 

Th 2/27 Lost

Jason Mittell, “Sites of Participation: Wiki Fandom and the Case of Lostpedia”:

http://journal.transformativeworks.org/index.php/twc/article/view/118/117

 

T 3/4 Pan’s Labyrinth and Sandman

Neil Gaiman, The Sandman: Season of Mists

 

Th 3/6 The Walking Dead

Take-home midterm due

 

Unit III: Science Fiction

 

T 3/11 Metropolis

J. P. Telotte, “The Seductive Text of Metropolis” (CP)

William Gibson, “The Gernsback Continuum” (CP)

Andrew Ross, “Getting Out of the Gernsback Continuum” (CP)

David Hartwell, excerpt from Age of Wonders (CP)

 

Th 3/13 The Twilight Zone

 

T 3/18 Spring Break – no class

 

Th 3/20 Spring Break – no class

 

T 3/25 Bride of Frankenstein

Gary Morris, “Sexual Subversion: The Bride of Frankenstein”:

http://www.brightlightsfilm.com/19/19_bride1.html

 

Th 3/27 Star Trek

Henry Jenkins, “Infinite Diversity in Infinite Combinations” (CP)

Ted Friedman, “Capitalism: The Final Frontier”:

http://www.tedfriedman.com/essays/2005/03/capitalism_the.html

 

T 4/1 Blade Runner

Donna Haraway, “A Manifesto for Cyborgs” (CP)

Fredric Jameson, “Postmodernism, or the Cultural Logic of Late Capitalism” (CP)

 

Th 4/3 The X-Files

Carl Jung, “Flying Saucers as Modern Myths” (CP)

 

T 4/8 Brazil and Ender’s Game

Orson Scott Card, Ender’s Game

 

Th 4/10 Battlestar Galactica

Spencer Ackerman, “Battlestar: Iraqtica,”

http://www.slate.com/id/2151425/nav/tap2/

 

T 4/15 The Matrix

David Weberman, “The Matrix: Simulation and the Postmodern Age” (CP)

Slavoj Zizek, “The Matrix, or the Two Sides of Perversion” (CP)

Aleksandar Hemon, “Beyond the Matrix”:

http://www.newyorker.com/reporting/2012/09/10/120910fa_fact_hemon

 

Th 4/17 World of Warcraft and The Guild

Download and play the free World of Warcraft trial:

http://www.worldofwarcraft.com

 

T 4/22 Children of Men and The Age of Miracles

Karen Thompson Walker, The Age of Miracles

 

Th 4/24 Futurama

 

 

Take-Home Final due via email to tedf@gsu.edu on Thursday, May 1 by 5 PM

 

 

 

Screening Schedule

 

You are responsible for viewing assigned films in time for class discussion. Screenings are held on Tuesdays at 11 AM in 406 Arts & Humanities.

 

1/14 No screening

1/21 Star Wars

1/28 The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring

2/4 The Wizard of Oz

2/11 The Company of Wolves

2/18 Where the Wild Things Are

2/25 Spirited Away

3/4 Pan’s Labyrinth

3/11 Metropolis

3/18 Spring Break – no class

3/25 Bride of Frankenstein

4/1 Blade Runner

4/8 Brazil

4/15 The Matrix

4/22 Children of Men

 

 

 

Assignments

 

The class assignments add up to total of 100 possible points. Your final grade for the class is determined by adding up your grades for each assignment, adjusting for attendance, then applying the final number to the following scale:

 

A+ 100-98 B+ 89-88 C+ 79-78 D 69-65

A 97-93 B 87-83 C 77-70 F 64-0

A- 92-90 B- 82-80

 

TV Presentation – 10 points (Film 4280 only)

As part of a 2-3 person team, you will give a presentation on an influential fantasy or science fiction television show. Your team has two presentation options:

 

Research Presentation: Each member of the team gives a 5-minute presentation on a different aspect of the show: 1) the creator/creators; 2) the economics of the production, including available budget and ratings information; 3) audience responses. Each member hands in a list of sources. A minimum of five separate sources is required for each member’s presentation. (Wikipedia can be consulted to find sources but does not itself count toward the five sources.) PowerPoint is not necessary, but short video clips (such as creator interviews, news stories, and fan films) should be incorporated into each presentation when available.

 

Creative Presentation: Alternately, the presentation team can choose to collectively produce a short film about the TV show. Options include an edited selection of clips with voice-over commentary, a series of interviews with viewers, or a fan film.

 

Book Presentations – 5 points each (Film 6280 only)

Graduate students will read two additional books of their choice, one scholarly book and one work of fiction, and will give short a presentation on each in two separately scheduled meetings with the other graduate students.

 

Take-Home Midterm – 45 points (Film 4280 and 6280)

The take-home midterm will require you to relate concepts from the readings and lectures to the assigned films, series, novels and comics. Undergraduate and graduate students will take the same exam, but graduate students will be expected to submit more detailed answers. Due March 7.

 

Take-Home Final – 45 points (Film 4280 and 6280)

The take-home final will be structured just like the midterm, covering the second half of the semester. Due April 30.

 

Attendance Adjustment

As Woody Allen put it, “80 percent of success is showing up.” It’s less than that in this formula, but the bottom line is that you can’t contribute to the class if you’re not there. You’re allowed one unexcused absence for the semester. After that, each unexcused absence subtracts one point from your grade total. Excused absences include medical and family emergencies. You will be expected to schedule any employment responsibilities around this class, or accept the consequences of missed classes for your grade. If you do need to miss a class, please contact me ahead of time, and make arrangements to catch up on missed material.

 

 

 

Policies

 

Office Hours

Office hours are by appointment. I’m usually available to meet before and after every class.

 

Late Papers

Late midterms are penalized at the rate of 1/2 point per day overdue. Late finals cannot be accepted without an extension.

 

Rewrites

Rewrites of any midterm question are welcome. The final grade on the question will be the average of the original grade and the rewritten version’s grade. Rewrites of the final are unavailable, but rough drafts of the final can be submitted for feedback through April 23.

 

Incompletes

Incompletes may be given only in special hardship cases. Incompletes will not be used merely for extending the time for completion of course requirements.

 

Assessment

Your constructive assessment of this course plays an indispensable role in shaping education at Georgia State. Upon completing the course, please take time to fill out the online course evaluation.

 

Disability

Students who wish to request accommodation for a disability may do so by registering with the Office of Disability Services. Students may only be accommodated upon issuance by the Office of Disability Services of a signed Accommodation Plan and are responsible for providing a copy of that plan to instructors of all classes in which accommodations are sought.

 

Changes to the Syllabus

This syllabus provides a general plan for the course. Deviations may be necessary.

Ted’s Top Music of 2013

Albums

1. Kanye West, Yeezus
2, Flaming Lips, The Terror
3. Daft Punk, Random Access Memories
4. Keith Jarrett Trio, Somewhere
5. Kurt Vile, Walking on a Pretty Daze
6. Ke$ha, The Warrior
7. Mazzy Star, Seasons of Your Day
8. Steven Price, Gravity Original Sountrack
9. Washed Out, Paracosm
10. Mountains, Centralia
11. Daughter, If You Leave
12. Tegan & Sara, Heartthrob
13. Moby, Innocents
14. Bibio, Silver Wilkinson
15. Flaming Lips,  Peace Sword
16. Laura Marling, Once I Was an Eagle
17. Ke$ha, Deconstructed
18. Dawes, Stories Don’t End
19. Goldfrapp, Tales of Us
20. June Tabor, Quercus
21. Boards of Canada, Tomorrow’s Harvest
22. Rye, Woman
23. Tim Hecker, Virgins
24. Vampire Weekend, Modern Vampires of the City
25. Justin Timberlake, The 20/20 Experience
Singles
1. Ke$sha with Pitbull, “Timber”
2. Florida Georgia Line featuring Nelly, “Cruise (Remix)”
3. Boards of Canada, “Reach for the Dead”
4. Daft Punk, “Get Lucky”
5. Robin Thicke et al, “Blurred Lines”
6. Darius Rucker, “Wagon Wheel”
7. Kurt Vile, “Air Bud”
8. Flaming LIps, “Peace Sword (Open Your Heart)”
9. Kanye West, “Bound 2”
10. DJ Earworm, “United States of Pop 2013 (Living the Fantasy)”

Convergence Culture, Fall 2013

Senior Seminar: Convergence Culture

Film 4910, Fall 2013

Tuesdays & Thursdays 2:30-3:45, Langdale 325

 

Ted Friedman

Office: 25 Park Place #1017

Email: ted@tedfriedman.com

Twitter: http://twitter.com/tedfriedman

Website: https://tedfriedman.com/teaching

 

Course Description

Media today are converging, as the boundaries that divide movies, TV, games, computers and phones blur. Likewise, the familiar categories of producer and consumer intermingle in Web 2.0 practices such as blogging, vidding, modding and tweeting. This senior seminar will examine the shifting roles of creators and audiences across a range of media practices, culminating in a capstone project that represents your own engagement with the changing media landscape.

 

Readings

Two books are required for the class:

  • Marcus Boon, In Praise of Copying (Harvard UP, 2010).
  • Henry Jenkins, Sam Ford, and Joshua Green, Spreadable Media (NYU Press, 2013).

In Praise of Copying can be downloaded for free at http://www.hup.harvard.edu/features/boon/. Spreadable Media can be purchased online from http://amazon.com, http://bn.com, or http://powells.com, or ordered from the campus bookstore. Other assigned readings are available online at the URLs listed below. Supplementary links to media news and criticism will be distributed via the class Twitter hashtag #sensem.

 

Capstone Project

This seminar is structured to support the creation of an individual project (research or creative) addressing some aspect of authorship, audiences, and/or convergence.  This project may either be a research paper (10-15 pages), a website (15-20 pages), a fiction/nonfiction video (5-10 minutes), a comic book (24 pages), or a game (a board game with cards and rules, or a computer game), depending on your preference and previous technical experience. (Students will not receive technical training in the details of video production or multimedia development as part of this class. Support is available through the GSU Digital Aquarium, http://www.gsu.edu/aquarium/.)  The final submitted project will be the culmination of a series of assignments, as described below.

Critical Thinking through Writing

This course is a designated Critical Thinking through Writing (CTW) course. In film, “critical thinking” is defined as identifying, analyzing, and evaluating arguments and truth claims; and formulating and presenting convincing reasons in support of conclusions.

“Writing” refers to the skill of writing clear, well-organized, and grammatically correct English prose.

Schedule

Introducing Convergence Culture

8/27 Introduction

In-class screening: Star Wars fan films

 

8/29 Read Henry Jenkins, “Quentin Tarantino’s Star Wars? Digital Cinema,

Media Convergence, and Participatory Culture,” Convergence Culture (NYU Press, 2006): http://web.mit.edu/cms/People/henry3/starwars.html

Read Chris Anderson, “The Long Tail,” Wired, December 2004:

http://www.wired.com/wired/archive/12.10/tail.html

In-class screening: Barbie Nation

 

The Culture of the Copy

9/3 Read Marcus Boon, In Praise of Copying, Introduction, Chapter 1

In-class screening: Rip! A Remix Manifesto 

 

9/5 Read Boon, Chapters 2-3

 

9/10 Read Boon, Chapters 4-6

In-class screening: Exit through the Gift Shop

Project Proposal due

 

9/12 Read Boon, Chapter 7, Conclusion

 

How Media Spreads

 

9/17 Read Jenkins et al, Spreadable Media, Introduction, Chapter 1

In-class screening: memes

 

9/19 Read Spreadable Media, Chapter 2

 

9/24 Read Spreadable Media, Chapter 3

Project Structure draft due

 

9/26 Read Spreadable Media, Chapter 4

 

Source/Influence Presentations

 

10/1 Source/Influence Presentations

 

10/3 Source/Influence Presentations

 

10/8 Source/Influence Presentations

Project Structure final draft due

 

10/10 Source/Influence Presentations

 

10/15 Source/Influence Presentations

 

10/17 Source/Influence Presentations

 

Proposal Workshops

 

10/22 Proposal Workshops

 

10/24 Proposal Workshops

 

10/29 Proposal Workshops

 

10/31 Proposal Workshops

 

11/5 Proposal Workshops

 

11/7 Proposal Workshops

 

Designing for Spreadability 

 

11/12 Read Spreadable Media, Chapters 5-6

In-class screening: Copyright Criminals

 

11/14 Read Spreadable Media, Chapter 7, Conclusion

 

 

 

Final Project Presentations

 

11/19 Final Project Presentations

 

11/21 Final Project Presentations

 

Thanksgiving Break – No classes on 11/26 &11/28

 

12/3 Final Project Presentations

 

12/5 Final Project Presentations

 

Final project due December 12

 

 

Assignments

 

The class assignments add up to total of 100 possible points. Your final grade for the class is determined by adding up your grades for each assignment, adjusting for attendance, then applying the final number to the following scale:

 

A 100-93 B+ 89-88 C+ 79-78 D 70-65

A- 92-90 B 87-83 C 77-73 F 64-0

B- 82-80 C- 72-70

 

Project Proposal – 10 points

Write a 2-3 page proposal.  Students creating research papers, nonfiction videos, or websites will detail the questions to be investigated and the sources they will use (including bibliography).  Those creating fiction videos will present a story synopsis and a statement of their project’s intended meaning/purpose. The proposal is due in class on September 10.

 

Source/Influence Presentation – 10 points

Pick one or more texts that you expect to engage in your project. These may be sources you plan to write about, clips you plan to sample, or models for your own creative work. Present to the class (10-15 minutes) the background and context for the sources or influences, discussing how you plan to engage them in your own project. Presentations will be scheduled from October 1-17.

 

Project Structure – 30 points

Write a 6-10 page document including the following segments:

 

I. Outline or script: 3-5 pages, form depending on project. An essay project should include an expanded outline. A nonfiction video project should include a detailed segmentation breaking down scenes. A fiction video project or comic book should include a full script. A website project should include a site map.

 

  1. Plan: 3-5 pages. You will answer a series of questions to flesh out your goals and strategies for the project. (More information to follow on a separate handout.)

A rough draft of the Project Structure is due in class on September 24. After meetings to discuss revisions, the final version is due in class October 8.

 

Proposal Workshop – 10 points

Present your work in progress to the class. Workshops will be scheduled from October 22-November 7.

 

Final Project Presentation – 10 points

After incorporating the class’s feedback from the Proposal Workshop, you will present a final version to the class at the end of the semester, November 19-December 5.

 

Final Project – 30 points

After incorporating further class feedback and polishing any rough edges, the final version of the capstone project is due on December 12.

 

Attendance Adjustment

As Woody Allen put it, “80 percent of success is showing up.” It’s less than that in this formula, but the bottom line is that you can’t contribute to the class if you’re not there. You’re allowed one unexcused absence for the semester. After that, each unexcused absence subtracts one point from your grade total. Excused absences include medical and family emergencies. You will be expected to schedule any employment responsibilities around this class, or accept the consequences of missed classes on your grade. If you do need to miss a class, please contact me ahead of time, and make arrangements to catch up on missed material.

 

 

Policies

 

Late Assignments

Late assignments will be marked off by ½ point for every day overdue unless an extension is agreed upon before the due date. No work can be accepted after the deadline for the final project. Any unsubmitted work will receive a 0.

 

Withdrawals

Students withdrawing on or before the midsemester point will receive a W provided they are passing the course. Students who withdraw after the midsemester point will not be eligible for a W except in cases of hardship. If you withdraw after the midsemester point, you will be assigned a WF, except in those cases in which (1) hardship status is determined by the Office of the Dean of Students because of emergency, employment, or health reasons, and (2) you are passing the course.

 

Incompletes

Incompletes may be given only in special hardship cases. Incompletes will not be used merely for extending the time for completion of course requirements.

 

Changes to the Syllabus

This syllabus provides a general plan for the course. Deviations may be necessary.

 

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Ted’s Top Music of 2012

Albums

1. Spiritualized, Sweet Heart Sweet Light

2. Taylor Swift, Red

3. Frank Ocean, channel ORANGE

4. Ellie Goulding, Halcyon

5. Burial, Kindred

6. Mount Eerie, Clear Moon

7. Lana Del Rey, Born to Die: Paradise Edition

8. Metric, Synthetica

9. Various Artists, Country Funk 1969-1975

10. The Men, Open Your Heart

11. Brian Eno, Lux

12. Neil Young & Crazy Horse, Psychedelic Pill

13. Kendrick Lamar, good kid, m.A.A.d City

14. Fiona Apple, The Idler Wheel… 

15. Bobby Womack, The Bravest Man in the Universe

16. Bob Dylan, Tempest

17. Bill Laswell, Means of Deliverance

18. Various Artists, The Hunger Games: Songs from District 12 and Beyond

19. Mumford & Sons, Babel

20. Neil Young & Crazy Horse, Americana

21. Air, Le Voyage Dans La Lune

22. Tracey Thorn, Tinsel & Lights

23. Robert Glasper, Black Radio

24. Dr. John, Locked Down

25. godspeed you! black emperor, Allelujah! Don’t Bend! Ascend!

26. Antony and the Johnsons, Cut the World

 

Singles

1. Psy, “Gangam Style”

2. Carlie Rae Jepsen, “Call Me Maybe”

3. Calvin Harris, “Feel So Close”

4. Cee-Lo Green, “River”

5. Beth Orton, “Magpie”

6. John Meyer, “Queen of California”

7. Lana del Rey, “National Anthem”

8. Pretty Lights, “You Get High”

9. Metric, “Artificial Noctourne”

10. Alt-J, “Tessellate”

Convergence Culture, Fall 2012

Senior Seminar: Convergence Culture
Film 4910, Fall 2012
Section 4910-005: Tuesdays & Thursdays 11:00-12:15, Sparks 305
Section 4910-010: Tuesdays & Thursdays 2:30-3:45, Sparks 329

Ted Friedman
Office: 738 One Park Place South
Email: ted@tedfriedman.com
Twitter: http://twitter.com/tedfriedman
Website: https://tedfriedman.com/teaching

Course Description
Media today are converging, as the boundaries that divide movies, TV, games, phones and the web blur. Likewise, the familiar categories of producer and consumer intermingle in Web 2.0 practices such as blogging, vidding, modding and tweeting. This senior seminar will examine the shifting roles of creators and audiences across a range of media practices, culminating in a capstone project that represents your own engagement with the changing media landscape.

Readings
Three books are required for the class:
Marcus Boon, In Praise of Copying (Harvard UP, 2010).
Bill Wasik, And Then There’s This: How Stories Live and Die in Viral Culture (Penguin, 2009).
Laurence Lessig: Remix: Making Art and Commerce Thrive in the Hybrid Economy (Penguin, 2008).
In Praise of Copying can be downloaded for free at http://www.hup.harvard.edu/features/boon/. Remix can be read for free online at http://www.scribd.com/doc/47089238/Remix. And Then There’s This can be purchased online from http://amazon.com, http://bn.com, or http://powells.com, or ordered from the campus bookstore. Other assigned readings are available online at the URLs listed below. Supplementary links to media news and criticism will be distributed via the class Twitter hashtag #sensem.

Capstone Project
This seminar is structured to support the creation of an individual project (research or creative) addressing some aspect of authorship, audiences, and/or convergence.  This project may either be a research paper (10-15 pages), a website (15-20 pages), a fiction/nonfiction video (5-10 minutes), a comic book (24 pages), or a game (a board game with cards and rules, or a computer game), depending on your preference and previous technical experience. (Students will not receive technical training in the details of video production or multimedia development as part of this class. Support is available through the GSU Digital Aquarium, http://www.gsu.edu/aquarium/.)  The final submitted project will be the culmination of a series of assignments, as described below.

Critical Thinking through Writing
This course is a designated Critical Thinking through Writing (CTW) course. It is designed as the capstone course for students majoring in Film/Media. In film/media studies, “critical thinking” is defined as identifying, analyzing, and evaluating arguments and truth claims, then formulating and presenting convincing reasons in support of conclusions.  “Writing” refers to the skill of writing clear, well-organized, and grammatically correct English prose. The emphasis throughout the process of creating the capstone project will be on ensuring that your project achieves your rhetorical ends. All students, whether they write a paper or do a more “creative” project, must clearly articulate those rhetorical strategies in writing and will revise those strategies based on feedback. In addition, students will demonstrate their ability to think critically in discussing their peers’ work, evaluating each individual project’s structure and its persuasive impact.

Schedule

Introducing Convergence Culture

8/21    Introduction
    In-class screening: Star Wars fan films    

8/23    Read Henry Jenkins, “Quentin Tarantino’s Star Wars? Digital Cinema,
    Media Convergence, and Participatory Culture”
    http://web.mit.edu/cms/People/henry3/starwars.html
    In-class screening: Barbie Nation

The Culture of the Copy

8/28    Read Marcus Boon, In Praise of Copying, Introduction, Chapter 1
    In-class screening: Rip! A Remix Manifesto
    
8/30     Read Boon, Chapters 2-3

9/4    Read Boon, Chapters 4-6
    In-class screening: Exit through the Gift Shop
    Project Proposal due

9/6    Read Boon, Chapter 7, Conclusion

Memetics

9/11     Read Bill Wasik, And Then There’s This, Introduction, Chapter 1
    In-class screening: memes

9/13    Read Wasik, Chapter 2

9/18    Read Wasik, Chapters 3-4
    Project Structure draft due

9/20    Read Wasik, Chapter 5, Conclusion

Source/Influence Presentations

9/25    Source/Influence Presentations

9/27    Source/Influence Presentations

10/2    Source/Influence Presentations
    Project Structure final draft due

10/4    Source/Influence Presentations

10/9    Source/Influence Presentations

Proposal Workshops

10/11    Proposal Workshops

10/16    Proposal Workshops

10/18    Proposal Workshops

10/23    Proposal Workshops

10/25    Proposal Workshops

10/30    Proposal Workshops

Remix Culture

11/1    Read Laurence Lessig, Remix, Part 1
    In-class screening: PressPausePlay

11/6    Read Lessig, Part 2

11/8    Read Lessig, Part 3

Final Project Presentations

11/13    Final Project Presentations

11/15    Final Project Presentations

11/27    Final Project Presentations

11/29    Final Project Presentations

Final project due December 6

Assignments

The class assignments add up to total of 100 possible points. Your final grade for the class is determined by adding up your grades for each assignment, adjusting for attendance, then applying the final number to the following scale:

A     100-93        B+    89-88        C+    79-78        D    70-65
A-    92-90        B    87-83        C    77-73        F    64-0
            B-    82-80        C-    72-70
                        
Project Proposal – 10 points
Write a 2-3 page proposal.  Students creating research papers, nonfiction videos, or websites will detail the questions to be investigated and the sources they will use (including bibliography).  Those creating fiction videos will present a story synopsis and a statement of their project’s intended meaning/purpose. The proposal is due in class on September 4.

Source/Influence Presentation – 10 points
Pick one or more texts that you expect to engage in your project. These may be sources you plan to write about, clips you plan to sample, or models for your own creative work. Present to the class (10-15 minutes) the background and context for the sources or influences, discussing how you plan to engage them in your own project. Presentations will be scheduled from September 25-October 9.

Project Structure – 30 points
Write a 6-10 page document including the following segments:

I. Outline or script: 3-5 pages, form depending on project. An essay project should include an expanded outline. A nonfiction video project should include a detailed segmentation breaking down scenes. A fiction video project or comic book should include a full script. A website project should include a site map.

II. Critical essay about the project: 3-5 pages. This paper should address three topics:
    – The goals for your project and how you plan to achieve them
    – How your project engages the ideas of the class, drawing on at least one of the assigned
        readings.
    – How you plan to engage the text or texts discussed in your Source/Influence
        Presentation

A rough draft of the Project Structure is due in class on September 18. After meetings to discuss revisions, the final version is due in class October 2.

Proposal Workshop – 10 points
Present your work in progress to the class. Workshops will be scheduled from October 11-30.

Final Project Presentation – 10 points
After incorporating the class’s feedback from the Proposal Workshop, you will present a final version to the class at the end of the semester, November 13-29.

Final Project – 30 points
After incorporating further class feedback and polishing any rough edges, the final version of the capstone project is due on December 6.

Attendance Adjustment
As Woody Allen put it, “80 percent of success is showing up.” It’s less than that in this formula, but the bottom line is that you can’t contribute to the class if you’re not there. You’re allowed one unexcused absence for the semester. After that, each unexcused absence subtracts one point from your grade total. Excused absences include medical and family emergencies. You will be expected to schedule any employment responsibilities around this class, or accept the consequences of missed classes on your grade. If you do need to miss a class, please contact me ahead of time, and make arrangements to catch up on missed material.

Policies

Late Assignments
Late assignments will be marked off by ½ point for every day overdue unless an extension is agreed upon before the due date. No work can be accepted after the deadline for the final project. Any unsubmitted work will receive a 0.

Withdrawals
Students withdrawing on or before the midsemester point will receive a W provided they are passing the course. Students who withdraw after the midsemester point will not be eligible for a W except in cases of hardship. If you withdraw after the midsemester point, you will be assigned a WF, except in those cases in which (1) hardship status is determined by the Office of the Dean of Students because of emergency, employment, or health reasons, and (2) you are passing the course.

Incompletes
Incompletes may be given only in special hardship cases. Incompletes will not be used merely for extending the time for completion of course requirements.

Changes to the Syllabus
This syllabus provides a general plan for the course. Deviations may be necessary.

Convergence Culture, Summer 2012

Film 4910, Summer 2012
Tuesdays & Thursdays 10:55-1:25, Classroom South 308

Ted Friedman
Office: 738 One Park Place South
Email: ted@tedfriedman.com     
Twitter: http://twitter.com/tedfriedman
Website: https://tedfriedman.com/teaching

Course Description
Media today are converging, as the boundaries that divide movies, TV, games, phones and the web blur. Likewise, the familiar categories of producer and consumer intermingle in Web 2.0 practices such as blogging, vidding, modding and tweeting. This senior seminar will examine the shifting roles of creators and audiences across a range of media practices, culminating in a capstone project that represents your own engagement with the changing media landscape.

Readings
Three books are required for the class:
Marcus Boon, In Praise of Copying (Harvard UP, 2010).
Bill Wasik, And Then There’s This: How Stories Live and Die in Viral Culture (Penguin, 2009).
Laurence Lessig: Remix: Making Art and Commerce Thrive in the Hybrid Economy (Penguin, 2008).
In Praise of Copying can be downloaded for free at http://www.hup.harvard.edu/features/boon/. Remix can be read for free online at http://www.scribd.com/doc/47089238/Remix. And Then There’s This can be purchased from http://amazon.com, http//:bn.com, http://powells.com, and other retailers. Other assigned readings are available online at the URLs listed below. Supplementary links to media news and criticism will be distributed via the class Twitter hashtag #sensem.

Capstone Project
This seminar is structured to support the creation of an individual project (research or creative) addressing some aspect of authorship, audiences, and/or convergence.  This project may either be a research paper (10-15 pages), a website (15-20 pages), a fiction/nonfiction video (5-10 minutes), a comic book (24 pages) or a game (a board game with cards and rules, or a computer game) depending on your preference and previous technical experience. (Students will not receive technical training in the details of video production or multimedia development as part of this class. Support is available through the GSU Digital Aquarium, http://www.gsu.edu/aquarium/.)   The final submitted project will be the culmination of a series of assignments, as described below.

Critical Thinking through Writing
This course is a designated Critical Thinking through Writing (CTW) course. It is designed as the capstone course for students majoring in Film/Media. In film/media studies, “critical thinking” is defined as identifying, analyzing, and evaluating arguments and truth claims, then formulating and presenting convincing reasons in support of conclusions.  “Writing” refers to the skill of writing clear, well-organized, and grammatically correct English prose. The emphasis throughout the process of creating the capstone project will be on ensuring that your project achieves your rhetorical ends. All students, whether they write a paper or do a more “creative” project, must clearly articulate those rhetorical strategies in writing and will revise those strategies based on feedback. In addition, students will demonstrate their ability to think critically in discussing their peers’ work, evaluating each individual project’s structure and its persuasive impact.

Schedule

Introducing Convergence Culture

6/5    Introduction
    In-class screening: Barbie Nation

6/7    Read Henry Jenkins, “Quentin Tarantino’s Star Wars? Digital Cinema,
    Media Convergence, and Participatory Culture”
    http://web.mit.edu/cms/People/henry3/starwars.html
    In-class screening: Star Wars fan films

The Culture of the Copy

6/12    Read Marcus Boon, In Praise of Copying, Introduction, Chapters 1-4
    In-class screening: Rip! A Remix Manifesto
    Project Proposal due

6/14    Read Boon, Chapter 5-7, Conclusion
    In-class screening: PressPausePlay

Memetics

6/19    Read Bill Wasik, And Then There’s This, Introduction, Chapters 1-2
    In-class screening: memes
    Project Structure draft due        

6/22     Read Wasik, Chapters 3-5, Conclusion
    In-class screening: memes
    

Source/Influence Presentations

6/26    Source/Influence Presentations
    Project Structure final draft due

6/28    Source/Influence Presentations

Proposal Workshops

7/3    Proposal Workshops

7/5    Proposal Workshops

Remix Culture

7/10    Read Laurence Lessig, Remix, Parts 1-2.
    In-class screening: Copyright Criminals

7/12    Read Lessig, Part 3.
    In-class screening: Exit through the Gift Shop

Final Project Presentations

7/17    Final Project Presentations

7/19    Final Project Presentations

Final project due July 26

Assignments

The class assignments add up to total of 100 possible points. Your final grade for the class is determined by adding up your grades for each assignment, adjusting for attendance, then applying the final number to the following scale:

A     100-93        B+    89-88        C+    79-78        D    70-65
A-    92-90        B    87-83        C    77-73        F    64-0
            B-    82-80        C-    72-70
                        
Project Proposal – 10 points
Write a 2-3 page proposal.  Students creating research papers, nonfiction videos, or websites will detail the questions to be investigated and the sources they will use (including bibliography).  Those creating fiction videos will present a story synopsis and a statement of their project’s intended meaning/purpose. The proposal is due in class on June 12.

Source/Influence Presentation – 10 points
Pick one or more texts that you expect to engage in your project. These may be sources you plan to write about, clips you plan to sample, or models for your own creative work. Present to the class (10-15 minutes) the background and context for the sources or influences, discussing how you plan to engage them in your own project. Source presentations will be June 26 and 28.

Project Structure – 30 points
Write a 6-10 page document including the following segments:

I. Outline or script: 3-5 pages, form depending on project. An essay project should include an expanded outline. A nonfiction video project should include a detailed segmentation breaking down scenes. A fiction video project or comic book should include a full script. A website project should include a site map.

II. Critical essay about the project: 3-5 pages. This paper should address three topics:
    – The goals for your project and how you plan to achieve them
    – How your project engages the ideas of the class, drawing on at least one of the assigned
        readings.
    – How you plan to engage the text or texts discussed in your source/influence
        presentation

A rough draft of the Project Structure is due in class on June 19. After meetings to discuss revisions, the final version is due in class June 26.

Proposal Workshop – 10 points
Present your work in progress to the class on July 3 or 5.

Final Project Presentation – 10 points
After incorporating the class’s feedback from the Proposal Workshop, you will present a final version to the class at the end of the semester, July 17 or 19.

Final Project – 30 points
After incorporating further class feedback and polishing any rough edges, the final version of the capstone project is due on July 26.

Attendance Adjustment
As Woody Allen put it, “80 percent of success is showing up.” It’s less than that in this formula, but the bottom line is that you can’t contribute to the class if you’re not there. You’re allowed one unexcused absence for the semester. After that, each unexcused absence subtracts one point from your grade total. Excused absences include medical and family emergencies. You will be expected to schedule any employment responsibilities around this class, or accept the consequences of missed classes on your grade. If you do need to miss a class, please contact me ahead of time, and make arrangements to catch up on missed material.

Policies

Late Assignments
Late assignments will be marked off by ½ point for every day overdue unless an extension is agreed upon before the due date. No work can be accepted after the deadline for the final project. Any unsubmitted work will receive a 0.

Withdrawals
Students withdrawing on or before the midsemester point will receive a W provided they are passing the course. Students who withdraw after the midsemester point will not be eligible for a W except in cases of hardship. If you withdraw after the midsemester point, you will be assigned a WF, except in those cases in which (1) hardship status is determined by the Office of the Dean of Students because of emergency, employment, or health reasons, and (2) you are passing the course.

Incompletes
Incompletes may be given only in special hardship cases. Incompletes will not be used merely for extending the time for completion of course requirements.

Changes to the Syllabus
This syllabus provides a general plan for the course. Deviations may be necessary.